Presto 75A Restoration Project

A customer recently imported a vintage Presto 75A disk recording lathe from the USA, with a view to cutting records in Europe.

He quickly discovered, like many people before him, that it was spinning a bit slower than it should, when operated from 50 Hz mains, via a simple step-down transformer. As with most vintage record cutting machines, the platter is powered by a synchronous AC motor, which “locks” to the line frequency.

Continue reading “Presto 75A Restoration Project”

Just Married: Forever preserved on vinyl record!

Mr and Mrs Agnew are now officially husband and wife! What better occasion to preserve forever, on a long lasting format that can be enjoyed by future generations?

The wedding ceremony and the wedding speech of J. I.’s father were recorded direct-to-disk, using a 1930’s Presto 75A disk recording lathe. It was also recorded in parallel on analog tape. A Nikon FT-2 35 mm film SLR camera was used for photography.

Analog media will last a very long time, making them ideal for the documentation of important events. They also contributed beautifully to the romantic aesthetic of our wedding.

Continue reading “Just Married: Forever preserved on vinyl record!”

Presto 75A: 50 Hz 33 1/3 and 45 rpm Conversion

It would appear that 50 Hz conversions of vintage “made in USA” disk recording lathes are becoming rather fashionable! Last week we examined how we converted a Rek-O-Kut Model V by machining a new capstan and making a special transformer, Type 1760.

We have done 50 Hz conversions (and even some 60 Hz ones!) on many different lathes and turntables, using all of the possible methods of doing so: New rubber rollers, new capstans, new belt pulleys and even electronic frequency conversion (Agnew Analog Type 191 frequency converter) for professional disk mastering systems.

This week, we will have a look at the Presto 75A, a high quality machine, dating from the 1930’s, which was even used by the BBC as a broadcasting turntable!

Continue reading “Presto 75A: 50 Hz 33 1/3 and 45 rpm Conversion”

Lab Report: An improved cutter head mounting system with integrated dashpot

 

The need for a new suspension for our recently presented Presto MRC-16 modification project brought about yet another innovation from our R&D laboratory: The Agnew Analog Reference Instrument Type 6021 Lathe Suspension Toolpost!

Inspired by the toolposts used in metalworking lathes and improving upon the cutter head mounting system used by Neumann, the Type 6021 will accurately and rigidly hold any cutter head fitted with a suitable bar, including Neumann, Vinylium and FloKaSon heads, as well as any other head imaginable, through the use of our Series 1400 head mount adapter range.

Continue reading “Lab Report: An improved cutter head mounting system with integrated dashpot”

Presto MRC-16 Variable Pitch Modification

A rather optimistic gentleman arrived with a Presto MRC-16 disk recording lathe, inquiring about the possibility of repairing the broken suspension and making a cutter head bracket from scratch. He then asked about the possibility of figuring out some way in which lead-in, lead-out, and track mark spirals could be cut on this machine, which was originally intended as a very basic machine, with no provision for spirals, not even a hand crank. Then came the really ambitious part: He would ideally like to be able to adjust the pitch and if possible, control the lathe through his computer!

One glance at the steampunk aesthetic of the manufacturer’s name plate and the overall state of this primitive machine would have been enough to deter the average engineer, in fear that there might be something potentially radioactive hiding within…

Continue reading “Presto MRC-16 Variable Pitch Modification”

Lab Report: Cutter Head Mounting Adapters

In the previous episode, we had a look at taper shank stylus adapters and saw a vintage magnetic monophonic cutter head fitted to the AM44 lathe. The two are not normally compatible. Neumann lathe suspensions do not have the same mount as the suspensions of Presto, Fairchild, RCA and other lathes of the monophonic era, which were originally designed to accept such cutter heads.

Continue reading “Lab Report: Cutter Head Mounting Adapters”

Lab Report: Making cutting stylus shank adapters

Stereophonic cutter heads developed by Neumann are designed to accept a cutting stylus with a conical shank, resembling a micro-miniature version of a Morse Taper, a type of fitting frequently encountered in machine tools, especially metalworking lathes. Vinylium and FloKaSon cutter heads also adopted the same fitting for the sake of compatibility. But most other cutter heads, especially all those predating the stereophonic era, used long, thin cylindrical shanks, often with a flat machined on one side, to allow a set-screw to align the stylus and secure it in place.

Continue reading “Lab Report: Making cutting stylus shank adapters”