machining (9)

The Vacuum Tube Electrochemical Synthesizer: Type 8001

The Agnew Analog Research and Development laboratory makes a major breakthrough in the fight against the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic!



It is not a vaccine and it probably won’t do much against the virus itself (although it has been suggested that it could have an effect not unlike the yodeling of Slim Whitman upon the aliens in Tim Burton’s “Mars Attacks”, either on the virus or on humans, or both), but will at least give you something to do while you wait it out.

The Agnew Analog Reference Instrument Type 8001 is a unique electrochemical synthesizer, generating strange sounds through chemical reactions occurring in the built in reactor cell.

Westrex 2B Stylus Adapter

The Westrex 2B is a motional feedback cutter head, introduced in 1952 by the Western Electric Export Company. It followed hot on the heels of the Westrex 2A, dating from 1947, which was itself a lateral implementation of the principles first described by Wiebusch, Vieth and Yenzer in 1938, with a couple of relevant patents issued by 1939, for a vertical cutter head employing motional feedback.

Fitting a Neumann Cutter Head to a Presto Lathe

Neumann cutter heads have a rib along the back, for mounting. Presto lathes, on the other hand, together with the vast majority of non-Neumann vintage lathes (Rek-O-Kut, Fairchild, etc.), have a mount with two slots, for cutter heads with two threaded holes on the back (Audax, Presto, Fairchild, RCA, etc).

School of Cut - Learning how to cut records at Agnew Analog

We recently had the pleasure of having Symatic over, from Bristol, UK, for a week of training on how to cut (and how not to cut) records.

Symatic runs Cut & Paste Records, a record label attracting some serious attention among skratchers, with high quality releases of skipless skratch samples, lock-groove tones, beats, and relevant music.

Presto 75A: 50 Hz 33 1/3 and 45 rpm Conversion

It would appear that 50 Hz conversions of vintage "made in USA" disk recording lathes are becoming rather fashionable! Last week we examined how we converted a Rek-O-Kut Model V by machining a new capstan and making a special transformer, Type 1760.

We have done 50 Hz conversions (and even some 60 Hz ones!) on many different lathes and turntables, using all of the possible methods of doing so: New rubber rollers, new capstans, new belt pulleys and even electronic frequency conversion (Agnew Analog Type 191 frequency converter) for professional disk mastering systems.

This week, we will have a look at the Presto 75A, a high quality machine, dating from the 1930's, which was even used by the BBC as a broadcasting turntable!